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Thursday, September 14, 2006

without freedom


David’s English
does the caged
nightingale hear?
mountain cuckoo

一茶
鶯は籠で聞かよ閑古鳥
uguisu wa kago de kiku ka yo kankodori

1822 Age 60,

sakuo Renku
自由なき身は上手く歌えぬ
jiyu naki mi ha umaku utae nu

without freedom
does not sing well

7 comments:

Natalia L. Rudychev said...

Beautifully expressed.

sakuo said...

natalia san, thank you for your comment.
I was very suprised that the temple of your cover page is in Hawaii.
It also come to my surprise that your favorite persons are Mishima, Hagiwara and Kurosawa.

sakuo.

Natalia L. Rudychev said...

Dear Sakuo San,

I came to know and love Kurosawa's films through extensive study of Russian film maker A. Tarkovsky who considered Kurosawa to be one of the greates artists of our time.
Tarkovsky knew Kurosawa personally.
And Kurosawa even wrote a very favourable essay about Tarkovsky's film Solaris (my favourite). Mishima's books are very popular in Russia. The Temple of the Golden Pavillion is an outstanding novel. It is both deeply philosophical and beautiful. Knowing about my fascination with art of Japan my husband presented me with Hagiwara's book Howling at the Moon. I had fallen in love with his rich imagery and unique style. I have been to Hawaii several times to present at the annual conference on arts and humanities. This year I will present a paper about the importance of wabi sabi world view for Tarkovsky's film Mirror.

Sincerely,

Natalia

sakuo said...

Natalia san,
thank you so much for your comment.
I don't know there is Japanese culture lover like you in the world.
I will pay attention to Tarkovsky whom you respect.
Hearing the book,Howling at the moon, I was very suprised.
Of course it is famous book ,but not so popular one.
Have you any special relationship with Japan?
For example, born in Japan? had spent time in Japan? or having something special?
Because wabi, sabi are quite paticular feeling.

sakuo.

Natalia L. Rudychev said...

Sakuo san

I think I've developed a special relationship with Japanese culture.
I was born in St Petersburg, Russia. I've never been to Japan though I plan to visit it one day.
I think it all started with Sadako story of 1000 paper cranes that was told to me when I was a child. Russia publishes many books on Japanese poetry, theater, and painting so it was easy to keep my interest alive. And in many ways I was lucky because the artists that I have studied in depth were influenced by Japanese culture, for example Tarkovsky. http://members.aol.com/Satokimit/RusCiCo_mirror.html One of my favourite architects Frank Lloyd Wright traveled to Japan and studied Japanese culture in depth. He was also a print collector and had several Hokusai prints in his possession. I even surprised the guide at the Fallingwater mansion that Frank Lloyd Wright created shouting Hokusai! Hokusai! There were no signs indicating that the prints on the wall were Hokusai's but one cannot mistake his work with anybody else's. I love Hokusai's work and my personal favourite is "Philosopher Watching a Pair of Butterflies". In 2003 I visited my mother in St. Petersburg and we went to see kabuki theater. I was really blessed because Nakamura Gandziro III performed in Love Suicides at Sonezaki playing the role of Ohatzu. I was deeply moved by this play and his performance. This year I visited St Petersburg again and was lucky again. I attended Japanese exhibition on Modern Haiku and Tanka. There I was introduced to Itami Etsuko. We talked with the help of the interpreter. I've read her some of my haiku and she liked them. As a parting gift she presented me with two of her handwritten poems. So I guess I can say I have a very special relationship with Japanese culture.

Natalia

sakuo said...

Natalia san, thank you for your story reffering to Japan culture.
I could understand your longing for old Edo Time.
If you come here in some day, I will willinglly guid you to old Edo Era in mordern Tokyo city.

sakuo.

Natalia L. Rudychev said...

Sakuo san

Thank you for your kind words.

Natalia